What is Beautiful?

Reflecting on the female obsession with weight loss, and the unrealistic images of woman as very skinny, perceptions of beauty in the United States are extremely skewed. It makes me wonder how we arrived here. Is it the media’s fault for projecting these images, or the consumer’s fault for enabling them? As we’ve read in “Can’t by my Love,” the advertising industry is worth billions of dollars exerting enormous influence over what is portrayed in the media. However, advertisers attempt to please their audiences by selling what they want. Therefore, what makes women crave the ideal body and perfect face? Not only do they crave this type of beauty, they spend millions of dollars attaining this ideal through surgery. They spend exorbitant amounts of money on dieting and weight loss regimes desperately hoping to reach this nearly impossible goal.
In “Reading the Slender Body,” Susan Bordo explains that although elective surgery is considered at least a bit more extreme, “…Preoccupation with fat, diet, and slenderness are not abnormal” Indeed, such preoccupation may function as one of the most powerful normalizing mechanisms of our century, insuring the production of self-monitoring and self-disciplining.” But still, it leaves the large question unanswered. Where does this preoccupation originate from? I believe that at least partially it stems from the way women construct their self-identity. In “Ways of Seeing,” John Berger asserts that women present themselves in the way that they want men to view them knowing that men are constantly surveying them. Consequently, at some point, a man’s ideal beautiful woman became extremely skinny with large breasts, and in response to this, women torture themselves in order to emulate this conception of beauty. With this norm present in society, women and men will continue to perceive beautiful in this way until culture gravitates towards a new standard of beauty.

Sources
Bordo, Susan. Umbearable Weight. Berkeley : Univ of CA Press, 1993.

Kilbourne, Jean. Can’t Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Thing and Feel. New York: Touchtsone, 1999.Print.

Berger, John. “From Ways of Seeing.” The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader. By Amelia Jones. London: Routledge, 2003. 37-39. Print.

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